Re: Hams and CUSEEME

Jay Shoup (jashoup@indiana.edu)
Sat, 20 Apr 1996 13:05:13 +5000


> Is there any way I can type in a "nickname" instead of a numeric address?
> For instance, "MTV.somewhere.cool" instead of 206.64.190.25? How do I
> find out what nickname to use?
> --
The "nick name" you seem to be talking about is not really a nick
name. It is actualy a Domain Name. That domain name is an assigned
domaine name. It is "matched" to the IP address assigned to your
computer by a domain name server.

IF you use a POP to gain internet access, the POP's DNS (Domain Name
Server) has that name assigned..

Most people have a DN / IP that changes each time they call up the
system. You can use a ping program to find out your IP and your
DN. If you use Win95 you can find it by looking in the network
settings in control panel.

Some POP's will provide a "Fixed IP and Domain Name" if
requested to do so , but general charge more for it.

If you have perminant connection you are likely have a fixed ip and
domain name. My connection, for example, is fixed. My IP is
149.159.15.26 and has a fixed DN of "shoup-jay.eigenmann.indiana.edu".

My DNS, provided by Indiana University, will assigne another name to
me if I request it. There would be some restrictions, for example,
the end of the Domain name would still need to be "Indiana.edu". This
part of the DN is assigned to IU and is used to indentify them. They
then assigne the remain portion of the DN as they see fit.

Since you are a ham, the ARRL has a good handout/short book on
TCP/IP. I can not remember the pub #, but you can look around at the
next ham fest...

In short, the answer to your question, NO.
But, you may be able to get you POP to assign one to you....

Hope this helps...

N9IVQ


Jay!
-------------------------------------------------
Jashoup@indiana.edu
http://149.159.15.26/index.html
FTP : 149.159.15.26 anonymous login

Jay Shoup
Eigenmann Hall RM 1281
Indiana University
Bloomington, Indidiana 47406
(812)857-2240 <Voice/Fax>
-------------------------------------------------

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