RE: Has CU-SeeMe a kamikaze protocol??

Laurent-David HASSON (ldh@interlog.com)
Thu, 22 Feb 1996 20:30:07 -0500


At 09:05 02/22/96 PST, Luther, Bil MV wrote:
>############################################
>sorry but none of the freebie academic users seem to understand that there's
>no free lunch -- a dozen or so video lurkers is like 1000 IRC lurkers or
>10000 surfers trying to search for information --- and the 'brown outs'
>serious surfer's with real information searches are experiencing have
>nothing to do with our modems or computers -- i'm using an IDN link in one
>case and a 28.8k modem in another -- each attached to dual processor
>pentiums -- and BROWNOUT is what we see a lot of -- e.g. connection
>time-outs -- hours to get to the webcrawler or hours to gain access into the
>USPTO database and in most cases the time outs occur long before the last
>hop....
>the sooner traffic is paid for the better -- the abuses are too high to
>tolerate
>sorry for the flame but the condescension in some of the replies,especially
>this one, has been absurd.
>##############################################

I totally agree with you. the problem with CUSeeMe is that it tries to take
all the bandwidth that it has available in a continuous manner... pretty
much like a continuous FTP session.... If you have 10 people on a network
who use a 28,8 connection at 100% over some period of time, then the net
result is as if hundreds of people were browsing the web with a 14.4. A
network admnistrator cannot ignore that, and cannot penalize the average
user because a few elite people make a heavy use of the bandwidth...

The same kind of problems do appear also with Internet providers and local
web pages. Here, someone put up a web page which became very popular, and
within a couple of months, most of the bandwidth that the ISP has access to
was taken by calls to that ONE web site...

I am sure you would not like it if some guy had a car that was 3 lanes wide
to block you... Same thing with Video.

At the beginning, IRC was a problem and a heavy load on the net... then it
passes... now, it is video and sound (CUSeeMe is not the only culprit, and i
am pretty sure video and sound on demand that are more and more popular on
web sites actually is resposible for more of the traffic than Video
conferencing).

People have to be relistic with their expectations, and i find it normal
that an ISP might want to limitate the CUSeeMe activity.... the same way a
few years ago, some servers only allowed IRC during off peak hours.

Laurent.