Re: Banned user....204.31.246.47

David Watson (dwatson@metz.une.edu.au)
Tue, 18 Jul 1995 11:26:55 +1000


>Personally, I abhore censorship of all kinds. A far better solution,
>imho, would have been to post a message to all who connect to your
>reflector, stating that nudity (or whatever) is not allowed. (I'm
>assuming that you had not already made such a message available before the
>user made use of your reflector.)
>
>Gordon Ross
>

By the very functions enabled by the reflector software censorship is
possible via the conference id. I am not advocating censorship, I am
advocating appropriate use of public sites. Until such time as graphic sex
is considered the norm for public behavior and viewing, it will not be
considered appropriate behavior for at least one reflector. In Australia,
pornography is illegal. If it is being broadcast knowingly or unknowingly,
it is illegal. In America you can wank to your hearts content and perhaps
it is legal to broadcast it as well. In Australia that is not the case.

With 10 lurkers someone would have been monitoring it. Perhaps "big
brother". What do you say to the president of the university, the local
pta, the police when querried about illegal activities "originating" from a
reflector at your site? What is your duty of care? In my case I covered my
ass and said....User Banned. Call it censorship. I call it being
responsible for the small bit of cyberspace that I caretake.

The idea that a reflector needs to have a sign posted upfront that says..No
Nudity, No Graphic Sex, No Picking Your Nose, is absurd. I've yet to go to
a city park, an airport or any other "public" place that has such postings.
Yet we go to these places and do not see such behavior (nose picking may be
an exception...). Common sense says in public places the common norm
prevails. The place for explicit behavior is not on an education based
reflector shared by school children, at least not in Australia.

You also wrote:

>On Sun, 16 Jul 1995, David Watson wrote:
>
>> In the new version it would be nice to be able to id the ip numbers of
>> lurkers...

>I disagree emphatically. Individual freedom is too important to have it
>taken away, piece by piece, by those who wish to increase their control
>over others. I heartily dislike the "Big Brother Is Watching You"
>mentality.
>

You should have stopped your watch in 1984. Big brother is watching you,
your bank account, the type of food you eat, and quite possibly the people
you interact with. If Big Brother is a problem for you, you better check
out now as the BB is here to stay. If you think otherwise your naive.

The ability to id lurkers ip numbers is apparently already a function on
the windows version. Far from BB reasons wanting to know the lurkers IP I
was looking for a way to get the IP number to allow for direct connections
to lurkers. There have been more than a few occasions when I would like to
speak or write to a lurker, but no address is available.

Perhaps for people who want to remain "undisclosed" a reflector network can
be set up to support them. It could work like anonymous mailers. Connect in
and strip off all the identifiers, only the reflector operator would know
the true identity. Not to worry, the reflector operator is someone called
"BB". They say you can trust "BB".

Cheers.

David Watson School of Health
Lecturer University of New England
Email: dwatson@metz.une.edu.au Armidale, NSW Australia 2351
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