Re: Red, Jason, and Donald

Jason Williams (streak@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu)
Mon, 4 May 1998 17:24:11 -0500 (CDT)


On Mon, 4 May 1998, Gary Dietz wrote:
> Not true. G.723 audio on CU works on point-to-point conferences with no
> intervening server.

True..in fact, you can even do G.723 audio on older White Pine reflectors
and Cornell/Enhanced Reflectors too I believe. But I was hinting that
G.723 was part of the standard to make CU H.323 compliant. Currently, the
only way for CU to interact with other H.323 clients is to use a MPCS
server. The move is still towards standards based conferencing.

> With MeetingPoint, you can use MS NetMeeting's audio in a true multi-point
> environment (though the video is only 1 remote window at a time).

The question I have, is it TRULY multipoint audio? I know certain
versions of CU barf when two people talk at the same time. From my
research on RTP, I know RTP allows for multiplexing of multiple streams
into one. At least I believe it does. The question is, does CU and
Netmeeting do this when multiple people try talking at the same time?

> In my personal experience, I can get great p-2-p audio on a 28.8 connection
> when the Internet Gods are friendly--which ain't on AOL on a Friday night ;-)

on AOL, I imagine the Internet Gods are never friendly (The "smite" button
is always close at hand) :)

> When I am on a LAN with a private MPCS server, I can get great audio
> conferencing quality (but then again I have the bandwidth).

Yep...when I've been on the campus T3, I can get great audio...but on a
28.8/33.6kbps modem, you're still pushing the limits.

> Other audio issues to tweak -
> 1) Get a good mic

This always helps...directional mic helps as well since it won't pick up
other background noise.

> 2) Determine if your sound card requires a powered mic or not. This can be
> a showstopper. Some audio God can jump in on this point.

I've never had to deal with...but I know the Macs have had problems with
this.. "plain talk" mics I believe.

> 3) Make sure the Windows audio system has the correct input selected and is
> pumping out enough volume.

The general rule I go for...is if I can hear my audio and it sounds
decent, then that's how it'll transmit. Always worked for me :)

--
streak@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu    * Jason Williams -- Austin, Tx.  |     |
streak@mail.utexas.edu       * University of Texas at Austin  | ___ |
streak@cs.utexas.edu         * BS Computer Science             \_|_/
*************** http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~streak/ **************|